Diary of a Narcissistic Misanthrope

I like to think I’m an acquired taste, like old whiskey or arsenic in your tea



My name is Clarence (Hello), born in 1988, i got my undergrad degree in Sociology (with a concentration in Women's Studies) and I'm utterly terrified. I'm scared of everything, people, my own feelings and sometimes even being but really there's nothing much to be done about that despite what I say. And I will say a lot about how my life has no meaning and i want to die (which is the majority of the time) but sometimes it seems like life is worth living for and everything in it is a spectacular explosion of awe inspiring wonder (which is usually a three week span some time in March). If it seems odd to read think what it might be like living it. So to get off the topic of terror I prefer stories es. I like to read them, I love to live in them and there is nothing better to me than a story so I guess this blog is a story mostly about me. Don't bother trying to find themes, connection or messages in what I post cause there really aren't any (unless they are completely accidental).



This blog is a story about what I find, what I feel and what I think so to that end I collect things to post or reblog. Its not meant to be anything truly meaningful or interconnected, just fun (mostly fun for me if you don't like it you can fuck right off) This is collection of all the the weird and interesting links from around the net that I find, comics, technology, comedy, current events, sociology, general geek/nerd interest, and more weird stuff. I think it makes for the closest representation to who I am that I've ever done and it just keeps growing bigger which is most of the fun. Please feel free to talk to me and don't mind the depressive tone i will probably be using. I like to think I'm somewhat fun if also a complete idiot.
Recent Tweets @
Who I Follow
Posts tagged "protest"
All over the place, from the popular culture to the propaganda system, there is constant pressure to make people feel that they are helpless, that the only role they can have is to ratify decisions and to consume.

Noam Chomsky

I think one thing our generation has lost is the drive to enact change ourselves. We often begin great discussions and raise exceptionally valid points, but I think sometimes we fail to push things far enough.

Our generation has done some great things: pushed for wider acceptance of gay marriage and gay rights, demanded an increase in women’s equality, elected a black president, supported the democratic uprising in the Arab Spring with the unprecedented use of technology, and we began pushing for wealth equality with the Occupy movement.

But I think we need to begin pushing back more. We need to have our voices heard and have a much larger impact on those in charge, to have some of our own demands met. Some older generations call us the “entitlement generation”, but there are certain things we should be entitled to that are unfortunately far out of reach for many of us. Things such as education, health care, well paying jobs, and affordable food and shelter are just some of the things we are entitled to as human beings, but that are being withheld from us while being told we have not worked hard enough, we are not old enough, or we are not rich enough.

I think if the playing field isn’t levelled out soon, our generation will have serious uprisings and causes to protest about. We aren’t saying we deserve to be handed certain things, we are saying we deserve the right to earn it ourselves, fairly. Pretty soon the older generations are going to begin relying on us as we become the primary income earners and providers. You would think that fact would make those in power ensure we are in a good position to take care of them when that time comes. And it is coming soon.

(via backpackersguidetoearth)

thepeoplesrecord:

Israel strikes Gaza, ready to ‘expand’ operation
November 14, 2012

The IDF announces a widespread campaign on “terror targets” and begins bombing the Gaza Strip, preparing for a ground operation. This comes after the head of Hamas’ military wing Ahmed Jabari was killed in an Israeli airstrike.

FOLLOW LIVE UPDATES

Hamas says now in ‘open war’ with Israel, promises ‘gates of hell’

The operation, called “Pillar of Defense”, has been launched by the Israel military. Many of the buildings in downtown Gaza City are on fire after being attacked by Israeli warplanes, RT’s Arabic correspondent Saed Swerky reports on Twitter.

The IDF says all options are on the table in Gaza, including a ground operation. Israeli warships have struck “terror sites” in the Gaza Strip, the military forces confirmed. 

“Today we sent a clear message to Hamas and other terrorist organizations, and if it becomes necessary we are prepared to expand the operation,” Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said in a televised address on Wednesday.

The country’s Defense Minister Ehud Barak declared a special situation in all Israeli territory, covering the area up to a radius of 40 kilometers around the Gaza Strip, the Jerusalem Post said.

The minister said that Israel is just at the start of the action, but in the long term, the operation will restore peace.

Israel has started emergency call up of reservists, while saying they are preparing for a ground invasion of Gaza, RT`s Tom Barton reports from Israel. The country’s Security Council has authorized the IDF to call on reservists and extend the Gaza operation if necessary. 

The strikes caused extensive damage to the long-range missile capabilities and underground weapons storage facilities, the IDF said on Twitter.

The Gaza Education Ministry has announced a suspension of study at Gaza schools and universities due to heavy fire by Israel.

 A large explosion occurred near home of Hamas leader, Mahmoud Zahar, Al Arabiya reported.

The death toll from some 20 strikes has risen to 10, two of them children, with at least 45 wounded, Gaza`s health minister said.

Jabari was traveling in his vehicle in Gaza City when his car was struck, AP reports, citing witnesses. Reports say Jabari, his son and three other people were killed in the strike.

An Israeli strike also targeted Raad Atar, another senior Hamas military wing commander, but he survived, Israeli Ynet reports.

The assassination has “opened the gates of hell,” the Ezzedine al-Qassam Brigades, the armed wing of Hamas, were quoted by AFP as saying. The militants vowed to ”continue the path of resistance.”

The IDF stated on its website that it has launched a “widespread campaign on terror sites and operatives in the Gaza Strip” and Jabari was its first target.  He’s the highest ranking Hamas official to be killed since 2009, when Israel conducted ground offensive against Gaza.

“The purpose of this operation was to severely impair the command and control chain of the Hamas leadership, as well as its terrorist infrastructure. This was a surgical operation in cooperation with the Israeli Security Agency, that was implemented on the basis of concrete intelligence and using advanced capabilities,” the statement said.

The crackdown follows the recent escalation of violence in the region. The conflict broke out last week when Palestinian militants attacked at an Israeli military jeep. 

Israel responded with retaliatory attacks, to which the Gaza Strip replied with heavy rocket fire at southern Israel.

Jabari is the most senior Hamas official to be killed since Operation Cast Lead in Gaza four years ago. He is believed to be behind the notorious abduction and detention of Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit, who was held hostage for more than four years until being released last year as part of a hostage swap deal.

21:37 GMT: Israeli National Security Minister Avi Dichter: “We have no intention to end this round of fighting and suffer more hits in the next”

21:06 GMT: The Israeli Security Cabinet has given the IDF permission to draft reservists and expand the Gaza operation. 

20:51 GMT: The Arab League will meet Saturday to discuss the Gaza attack, reports Egypt’s news agency. 

20:43 GMT: Israel’s ambassador to Egypt has left for Tel Aviv together with a number of the embassy’s employees, claim some media reports. Others insist embassy functioning as usual. 

19:55 GMT: Israel is reportedly preparing for a ground operation into Gaza

Source

At 9:29 Eastern time, the Israeli Defense Forced announced via Twitter that it would attack Gaza today to “protect Israeli civilians and to cripple terrorist infrastructure in the Gaza Strip.”

An emergency protest to demand an end to the Israeli strikes in Gaza will be tomorrow at 5 p.m. at the Israeli Consulate in New York City.

(via princessnijireiki)

Under capitalist conditions…every criticism and every protest is fundamentally senseless, for in capitalism language itself functions as a commodity, that is to say, it is inherently mute. Discourses of critique and protest are recognized as successful when they sell well, and to have failed when they sell poorly. Thus in no respect can these discourses be distinguished from other commodities, which are equally silent—or speak only in self-advertisement.
Boris Groys, ‘The Communist Postscript’  (via aidsnegligee)

(via sociolab)

thepeoplesrecord:

How higher education in the US was destroyed in 5 basic steps

October 19, 2012

(Note from The People’s Record: This post is partial, taking only segments from each of the five bullet points in the original article and none of the conclusion because people don’t like long articles on tumblr. In this case, I would recommend following the link at the bottom and reading the whole thing if you have a few moments. I think it’s important.)

It was during this time (the 1960s), when colleges had a thriving professoriate, and when students were given access to a variety of subject areas, and the possibility of broad learning. The liberal arts stood at the center of a college education, and students were exposed to philosophy, anthropology, literature, history, sociology, world religions, foreign languages and cultures. Of course, something else happened, beginning in the late ’50s into the ’60s — the uprisings and growing numbers of citizens taking part in popular dissent — against the Vietnam War, against racism, against destruction of the environment in a growing corporatized culture, against misogyny, against homophobia. Where did much of that revolt incubate? Where did large numbers of well-educated, intellectual, and vocal people congregate? On college campuses. Who didn’t like the outcome of the ’60s? The corporations, the war-mongers, those in our society who would keep us divided based on our race, our gender, our sexual orientation.

But a country claiming to have democratic values can’t just shut down its universities. So, how do you kill the universities of the country without showing your hand? As a child growing up during the Cold War, I was taught that the communist countries in the first half of the 20th century put their scholars, intellectuals and artists into prison camps, called “re-education camps.” What I’ve come to realize as an adult is that American corporatism despises those same individuals as much as we were told communism did. But instead of doing anything so obvious as throwing them into prison, here those same people are thrown into dire poverty. The outcome is the same. Desperate poverty controls and ultimately breaks people as effectively as prison…..and some research says that it works even more powerfully.

Step I: Defund public higher education .

Anna Victoria:. Funding for public universities comes from, as the term suggests, the state and federal government. Yet starting in the early 1980s, shifting state priorities forced public universities to increasingly rely on other sources of revenue. For example, in the University of Washington school system, state funding for schools decreased as a percentage of total public education budgets from 82% in 1989 to 51% in 2011.”

That’s a loss of more than a third of its public funding. But why this shift in priorities? U.C. Berkeley English professor Christopher Newfield, in his new book Unmaking the Public Universityposits that conservative elites have worked to defund higher education explicitly because of its function in creating a more empowered, democratic, and multiracial middle class. His theory is one that blames explicit cultural concern, not financial woes, for the current decreases in funding. He cites the fact that California public universities were forced to reject 300,000 applicants because of lack of funding. Newfield explains that much of the motive behind conservative advocacy for defunding of public education is racial, pro-corporate and anti-protest in nature.

Under the guise of many “conflicts,” such as budget struggles, or quotas, defunding was consistently the result. This funding argument also was used to reshape the kind of course offerings and curriculum focus found on campuses. Victoria writes, “Attacks on humanities curriculums, political correctness, and affirmative action shifted the conversation on public universities to the right, creating a climate of skepticism around state funded schools. State budget debates became platforms for conservatives to argue why certain disciplines such as sociology, history, anthropology, minority studies, language, and gender studies should be defunded…” on one hand, through the argument that they were not offering students the “practical” skills needed for the job market — which was a powerful way to increase emphasis on what now is seen as vocational focus rather than actual higher education, and to devalue those very courses that trained and expanded the mind, developed a more complete human being, a more actively intelligent person and involved citizen.

Step II: Deprofessionalize and impoverish the professors (and continue to create a surplus of underemployed and unemployed Ph.D.s)

We have 1.5 million university professors in this country, 1 million of whom are adjuncts. One million professors in America are hired on short-term contracts, most often for one semester at a time, with no job security whatsoever – which means that they have no idea how much work they will have in any given semester, and that they are often completely unemployed over summer months when work is nearly impossible to find (and many of the unemployed adjuncts do not qualify for unemployment payments). So, one million American university professors are earning, on average, $20K a year gross, with no benefits or healthcare, no unemployment insurance when they are out of work. Keep in mind, too, that many of the more recent Ph.Ds have entered this field often with the burden of six figure student loan debt on their backs.

This is how you break the evil, wicked, leftist academic class in America — you turn them into low-wage members of the precariat – that growing number of American workers whose employment is consistently precarious. All around the country, our undergraduates are being taught by faculty living at or near the poverty line, who have little to no say in the way classes are being taught, the number of students in a class, or how curriculum is being designed. They often have no offices in which to meet their students, no professional staff support, no professional development support. One million of our college professors are struggling to continue offering the best they can in the face of this wasteland of deteriorated professional support, while living the very worst kind of economic insecurity.

Step III: Move in a managerial/administrative class that takes over governance of the university

Universities often defend their use of adjuncts – which are now 75% of all professors in the country — claiming that they have no choice but to hire adjuncts, as a “cost saving measure” in an increasingly defunded university. What they don’t say, and without demand of transparency will never say, is that they have not saved money by hiring adjuncts — they have reduced faculty salaries, security and power. The money wasn’t saved, because it was simply re-allocated to administrative salaries, coach salaries and outrageous university president salaries. There has been a redistribution of funds away from those who actually teach, the scholars – and therefore away from the students’ education itself — and into these administrative and executive salaries, sports costs — and the expanded use of “consultants,” PR and marketing firms, law firms. 

Step IV: Move in corporate culture and corporate money.

To further control and dominate how the university is “used” — a flood of corporate money results in changing the value and mission of the university from a place where an educated citizenry is seen as a social good, where intellect and reasoning is developed and heightened for the value of the individual and for society, to a place of vocational training, focused on profit. Corporate culture hijacked the narrative – university was no longer attended for the development of your mind. It was where you went so you could get a “good job.” Anything not immediately and directly related to job preparation or hiring was denigrated and seen as worthless — philosophy, literature, art, history.

Step V: Destroy the students.

While claiming to offer them hope of a better life, our corporatized universities are ruining the lives of our students. This is accomplished through a two-prong tactic: you dumb down and destroy the quality of the education so that no one on campus is really learning to think, to question, to reason. Instead, they are learning to obey, to withstand “tests” and “exams,” to follow rules, to endure absurdity and abuse. Our students have been denied full-time available faculty, the ability to develop mentors and advisors, faculty-designed syllabi which changes each semester, a wide variety of courses and options. Instead, more and more universities have core curriculum which dictates a large portion of the course of study, in which the majority of classes are administrative-designed “common syllabi” courses, taught by an army of underpaid, part-time faculty in a model that more closely resembles a factory or the industrial kitchen of a fast food restaurant than an institution of higher learning.

The Second Prong: You make college so insanely unaffordable that only the wealthiest students from the wealthiest of families can afford to go to the school debt free. Younger people may not know that for much of the 20th century many universities in the U.S. were free, including the CA state system: you could establish residency in six months and go to Berkeley for free, or at very low cost. When I was an undergraduate student in the mid- to late-1970s, tuition at Temple University was around $700 a year. Today, tuition is nearly $15,000 a year. Tuitions have increased, using CA as an example again, over 2000% since the 1970s.

Source/Full Article

(via silas216)

theweekmagazine:

This Ukrainian woman is protesting a government-backed bill that she and others fear will be used to muzzle the media.

Check out more of this week’s weird photos

Chicago, IL — After holding NATO protesters for up to 48 hours, and releasing 6 out of 9 arrestees without any charges, the City of Chicago filed state charges last night against 3 Occupy activists from Florida, including possession of explosives or incendiary devices, material support for terrorism, and conspiracy. On Wednesday night at approximately 11:30pm, police raided a house in the Bridgeport neighborhood, detained several people in multiple apartments, and arrested 9 activists. Police broke down doors with guns drawn and searched residences without a warrant or consent.

NLG Opposes “Terrorism” Charges Against Occupy Activists | nlgchicago.org

It’s unbelievable that this should happen in the USA, in the President’s own hometown. The whole world’s watching’.

(via drwh0)

(via drwh0)

bankruptingamerica:

Rolling Stone journalist Matt Taibbi — he who coined the immortal phrase about Goldman Sachs being a “bloodsucking vampire” — spoke at an Occupy Wall Street rally today. Via Taibbi’s blog:

Occupy Wall Street is kicking off a new series of actions today, and as part of the campaign, I’m going to be speaking at Bryant Park at 11 a.m., through about noon, when a march will begin.

The topic is Too-Big-To-Fail banks, and Bank of America in particular.

The Twitters were abuzz with reports from his speech. We’re going to post a few of Taibbi’s thoughts about Bank of America via Twitter.

(via occupywallstreet)

It is always morally superior, [Gandhi] insisted, to oppose injustice through non-violent means than through violent means. However, to oppose injustice through violent means is still morally superior to not doing anything to oppose injustice at all.

“And Gandhi was talking about people who were blowing up trains, or assassinating government officials. Not damaging windows or spray-painting rude things about the police.

Prof. David Graeber, Anthropologist/ anarchist/ scholar-activist (via rethinkcapitalism)

(via sociolab)

cognitivedissonance:

Let’s hope.

cognitivedissonance:

political pictures - Just Cause for Revolution

Kitteh can HAZ cheezburger with solidarity!